nataliereed84:

This one: “Trans *”

Personally, my problems with the asterisk aren’t of a nature of “this excludes trans women!” or whatever. It doesn’t. Nor are they based in an ignorance of the issues of non-binary semantic inclusion.

My criticisms are principally of…

a) the relative worth or value of the…

dancetaire:

precarioussanity:

thatcorbincrow:

can there please be some kind of online exchange where trans boys can give their old clothes to trans girls and vice versa? does that exist? if not am i allowed to start one because holy wow that would be the bomb diggety

can this happen

THERE IS ACTUALLY A BLOG FOR THIS NOW

and cis people can also donate clothes, because that gives people a bigger pool to get clothes from and it’s one of the ways that we can be active allies for our trans siblings

(via evelark)

slugzone:

i can only buy clothes in the womens section of target because most of the times when i have gone into the mens section to look for clothes i have gotten laughed at by the men there or at least glared at and when i try to just grin and bear it and buy mens clothes (which i am most comfortable in even though i do not identify exclusively as male) i cant try them on bc im afraid to put myself in a situation where an employee is likely going to tell me “you know these are men’s clothes, right?” and i can only speak as a dfab person, trans women face an immensely higher risk when they go shopping in the womens section in public

and even aside from the fact that going shopping is such an anxiety inducing experience for many trans people, most trans kids arent going to have had a lifetime to build up a wardrobe that theyre comfortable with, because they will have been given a large amount of them to them by people who gender them incorrectly & in a way they are not comfortable with, and have likely purchased either masculine or feminine clothes for themselves due to the overwhelming pressure to conform to their designated gender. many trans people have to rebuild their wardrobe entirely from scratch.

this is why if youre cis and you are demanding to be given clothes from a clothes exchange for trans people u are a fucking hellmonster

(via dangercupcakemurdericing)

yunglapras:

thedamnedandunrepairable:

Honestly tumblr kinda makes me hate people who are trans, not because I think anything is wrong with them but because people will literally say a joke and there will be 50 people on their page flipping shit about how they’re transphobic when it wasn’t even meant to offend them.

i know how you feel OP, tumblr makes me hate cis people, not because there’s anything wrong with them, but because they make whiny self centered posts about why they’re not allowed to hurt trans* people for fun

(via blue-author)

teacatsinspace:

teacatsinspace:

I want to talk to people who use gender-neutral pronouns besides they/them about why they chose the ones they chose and about feeling like choosing neutrals besides they/them is an imposition or asking too much

Reblogging cause I’m still interested in talking to people about this. Also it was pointed out to me that my initial phrasing might have been unclear—my question is: for those of you who use, for yourselves, pronouns that are NOT he or she or they, what led you to choose the set you use (just cause I’m curious and it’s interesting), and, have you struggled with feeling like it is an imposition to ask people to use your pronouns, basically has the “changing how I talk is too haaard” mindset created an anxiety for you even if you think it’s BS, is that normal, inform and soothe me plz

(Source: demimagica, via demimagica)

soulstooloud:

foxnosocks:

kyliesparks27:

queerpositive:

buttscuiteer:

raverjesus:

loveyourrebellion:

D.C. Launches First Ever Transgender Respect Ad Campaign

Yes, good.

I will respect these posters forever because they put a genderfluid/genderqueer/whatever person. That is normally so overlooked.

This campaign has a lot of awesome stuff going for it.

1) Transgender PoC make up about half the face of the campaign.

2) There is a genderqueer person (!!) and their caption respectfully uses “person” instead of man or woman.

3) Plus-sized trans* people for the win!

4) Finally a campaign explicitly for trans* people that emphasizes our deserving respect and courtesy.

5) The transgender women and men are included in “any woman/man” which is huge because it emphasizes that trans* women and men are women and men too; it leaves no room for argument and doesn’t turn it into a debate about genitals.

6) Emphasis on our being a part of the communities we live in. We aren’t any different than anyone else.

I really love the DC Transgender Respect campaign and I wish more states and cities would launch stuff like this!

- Jax

Bravo, DC. I hope this begins a widespread campaign. People shouldn’t be harassed for who they are EVER.

All right guys, let’s see one of these canpaigns for all 50 states too. Ready…GO!

The national politicians may suck, but its things like this that make me love DC

(via shulamithbond)

4342) When I was a kid, I didn’t quite know why “heshe” hurt me more than other insuls, but it did. Then when I got to middle school and learned that hermaphroditism was a real thing, I could barely contain my glee but I didn’t understand that either. Years later, after I had realized my trans* status, I had a rather intense moment of “oh. duh.”

thatcrazytransgirl:

Humans can’t be hermaphroditic, they would need both fully functions sexual organs of either sex.
Humans can be intersex, which means they have ambiguous genitalia.

It is actually possible for a human to have both ovarian and testicular gonadal tissues, and thus fulfill the scientific definition of hermaphroditism (it’s hard to functionally define “fully functional” and it’s not a requirement), but it’s incredibly rare.

That said, “hermaphrodite” applied to human beings is almost always both scientifically inaccurate and offensive.  Like any other slur, people to whom it is applied might choose to reclaim it, but if it’s not being used against you, you don’t get to make the call.

Intersex conditions can result in ambiguous or “atypical” genitalia (one example of genitals that are considered atypical but not ambiguous would be what is considered a “micropenis,” that is, a penis that cannot be stretched to one inch in length at birth).  It’s important to recognize, however, that intersex people can also be born with genitalia that are considered completely “typical.”

One example of this would be “complete” Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (AIS), where a newborn is assigned female based on observed genitalia at birth, but has XY chromosomes and internal testes rather than ovaries.  This is typically diagnosed when a female-assigned person reaches an advanced age without menstruating, or in some cases, when treatment is sought for infertility.  Most people with complete AIS also self-identify as women.

Basically, biological sex is super complicated and definitely NOT limited to “two sexes” (which I know thatcrazytransgirl knows), and while I want people to learn accurate and not hurtful terminology, I’m honestly pretty happy just to hear that more people are becoming aware of this relatively early in life.

(Source: mtfconfessions)

alexandraerin:

forgotten-sad-spirit:

bitchesyellback:

forgotten-sad-spirit:

If you say the word cis ever around me I will most likely stab you directly in the throat

Aww because you dont get to feel “normal” and better than trans people?

No, because equality can never happen as long as you’re separating yourself from others. You’re not genderqueer, you’re a human. You’re not white. You’re a human. You’re not male, and you’re not female, you’re a human. Maybe once people start realizing we’re all humans, we can stop this perpetual circle of hatred toward one another.

Actually, equality can never happen as long as we conceive of “human” as a singular and narrow thing. The state of affairs that inevitably results when we stop talking about the different categories of humanity is that the most common groups within humanity become even more dominant and more entrenched as the default.

Everybody in this society has to know a lot about cis folk, because we’re surrounded by them. Cis folk have the luxury of not having to learn anything about trans folk, because we’re outnumbered enough that we can easily become completely invisible. Saying “nobody talk about anyone being cis or trans” has the same impact as saying “nobody talk about anyone being trans”.

Is that equality to you? It sounds like the opposite of it to me.

(Source: , via blue-author)

nudiemuse:

My ask box is acting up:

katsuricata asked you: Hey. :) I’m a trans woman, who is also white, who chooses to identify as feminist. I understand what you mean by silence from feminists regarding your community’s problems (though not on a 1:1 basis, obviously). I don’t understand why it would make…

"“Right now many of our youth are being told that their identification re-enforces a “gender binary.” “Gay” or “Lesbian” labels are definitions that rely on a gender binary, but bi youth are the ones being targeted for being transphobic. When I ask someone why they don’t call themselves bisexual, it’s rarely because of their own internal preferences. We’re being forced to identify as something else, ostensibly because our orientation is “offensive” to our oldest allies. The trans and bi women who rioted at Stonewall and were the “mothers” of Pride,” must scream in their graves at the notion we B and T be used against each other.”"

Faith Cheltenham, President of BiNet USA (After Ellen - Pop Theory: On Bisexuality)

I am not on board with arguing that non-monosexual people ID as something other than bi “mainly” because they’re forced to.  I think the constant insistence of non-bi people on a definition of bisexuality that most actual bi people don’t agree with is a factor for some people in not ID’ing as bi, but ultimately it’s none of my damn business why a person IDs the way they do, if the label they choose makes the most sense to them.

At the same time, as previously noted, I do hear this particular anti-bi stereotype—“You only like two genders/You only like men and women/You obviously care deeply about genitals”—more from pan-identified people than from LG-identified people (or trans* people, for that matter).

I DON’T think this is all pan people, or solely something that pan people do.  LG people say plenty of hurtful shit to and about bi people; it’s just mainly centered on their belief that we don’t exist, but sometimes the “you’re so binary” shit gets thrown in for some variety.

There are a LOT of people who are specifically biased against/terrified of non-monosexuality, and pan people and bi people get plenty of the same non-monosexual negative stereotypes applied to us by both straight and LG people.  But just as biphobia from the queer community often hits us harder than when it comes from straight people, biphobia from other non-monosexuals is, to me, particularly painful.

(Source: bisexualmind, via craftastrophies)

alexandraerin:

nickgibberish:

Why? It’s a common question. I wouldn’t ask it personally. But it’s not like my first thought is “Oh that’s unnatural.” No it’s genuine curiosity.

Yes, it’s a common question. I’m not sure how you think that is a defense, though. There are many common reactions to learning someone is trans. We don’t judge how appropriate they are by how frequently they happen.
Here’s the thing: in what circumstances do you feel like the contents of someone you’ve just met’s underwear is both your business and an appropriate subject for conversation? Is that most circumstances, or pretty much just this one?
If it’s pretty much just this one, then basically, that requires that trans people have different (fewer, looser) boundaries than cis people, that the rules of common decency and courtesy don’t all apply to us.
And that’s transphobic.
Being curious about something doesn’t make it your business. If you can’t keep from being curious, you can still learn to keep it to yourself. 

alexandraerin:

nickgibberish:

Why? It’s a common question. I wouldn’t ask it personally. But it’s not like my first thought is “Oh that’s unnatural.” No it’s genuine curiosity.

Yes, it’s a common question. I’m not sure how you think that is a defense, though. There are many common reactions to learning someone is trans. We don’t judge how appropriate they are by how frequently they happen.

Here’s the thing: in what circumstances do you feel like the contents of someone you’ve just met’s underwear is both your business and an appropriate subject for conversation? Is that most circumstances, or pretty much just this one?

If it’s pretty much just this one, then basically, that requires that trans people have different (fewer, looser) boundaries than cis people, that the rules of common decency and courtesy don’t all apply to us.

And that’s transphobic.

Being curious about something doesn’t make it your business. If you can’t keep from being curious, you can still learn to keep it to yourself. 

(Source: social-justice-wario, via blue-author)

kiriamaya:

One of my complaints about character creators in games is that, in most games, you don’t get to make tall women with broad shoulders and square faces; i.e., you don’t get to make characters that look like what a lot of trans women look like. This bugs me on a level I can’t really express.

Like,…

ciscritical-not-cisphobic:

“All trans women’s experiences are women’s experiences because a woman is experiencing them.”

I do sincerely wonder how many of the cis and CAFAB trans rebloggers actually get what I meant when I wrote that.

All experiences had by every trans woman are women’s…

alexandraerin:

trishatosh:

dearcispeople:

Dear Cis People:
You are not, for any reason, under any circumstances, by any means, allowed to have an opinion on my identity. It does not work that way. Get over yourselves, you are not the gender police. Gender is not a simple 2-position switch, I’m allowed to mix and match. Get over that, too.

I really just don’t like all these anti-cis sentiments out there. It is absolutely stupid to lump all non-trans identifying people into one group and assume that they’re all ignorant jerks. It creates a schism which in turn delineates the world into us and them.
There is no us or them. We’re all people.

When you read a sign that says “ATTENTION LIBRARY PATRONS, THERE IS NO EATING OR DRINKING IN THE LIBRARY”, do you go up to the circulation desk to complain that it’s not fair to lump all library patrons together and you’re not like those other library patrons who would need to be told and they’re creating a needless schism between library patrons and everyone else?
No. Of course not. You understand that, as a library patron, the instructions apply to you whether you need to be told or not, but the fact that the instructions are provided don’t imply anything about you personally. And they’re addressed to library patrons because that’s who they’re aimed at. People in the sandwich shop across the street don’t need to be told there’s no eating in the library, at least not until they come over and patronize it.
This letter is addressed to cis people because that’s who it applies to. It is lumping all cis people together, but only as a category that should not be going around opining about trans* identities.
If you’re cis, there are exactly two possibilities here: either you agree that it’s not your place to do that, in which case I don’t understand why your response to this would be anything other than nodding in agreement, or you disagree, which… okay, like, that’s just your opinion or whatever, but yeah, then you’ve got no right to complain about an open letter addressed to a generalized you on the subject.
The “schism” is created by the entitlement of the privileged to think of themselves as the normal unmarked state, free from criticism and in no need of advice. And that entitlement will rear its head any time it isn’t 100% catered to, no matter how gently or politely the message (and the one above isn’t even that rude, just direct)… better to confront it and point it out when it arises than tiptoe around it and hope it goes away.

alexandraerin:

trishatosh:

dearcispeople:

Dear Cis People:

You are not, for any reason, under any circumstances, by any means, allowed to have an opinion on my identity. It does not work that way. Get over yourselves, you are not the gender police. Gender is not a simple 2-position switch, I’m allowed to mix and match. Get over that, too.

I really just don’t like all these anti-cis sentiments out there. It is absolutely stupid to lump all non-trans identifying people into one group and assume that they’re all ignorant jerks. It creates a schism which in turn delineates the world into us and them.

There is no us or them. We’re all people.

When you read a sign that says “ATTENTION LIBRARY PATRONS, THERE IS NO EATING OR DRINKING IN THE LIBRARY”, do you go up to the circulation desk to complain that it’s not fair to lump all library patrons together and you’re not like those other library patrons who would need to be told and they’re creating a needless schism between library patrons and everyone else?

No. Of course not. You understand that, as a library patron, the instructions apply to you whether you need to be told or not, but the fact that the instructions are provided don’t imply anything about you personally. And they’re addressed to library patrons because that’s who they’re aimed at. People in the sandwich shop across the street don’t need to be told there’s no eating in the library, at least not until they come over and patronize it.

This letter is addressed to cis people because that’s who it applies to. It is lumping all cis people together, but only as a category that should not be going around opining about trans* identities.

If you’re cis, there are exactly two possibilities here: either you agree that it’s not your place to do that, in which case I don’t understand why your response to this would be anything other than nodding in agreement, or you disagree, which… okay, like, that’s just your opinion or whatever, but yeah, then you’ve got no right to complain about an open letter addressed to a generalized you on the subject.

The “schism” is created by the entitlement of the privileged to think of themselves as the normal unmarked state, free from criticism and in no need of advice. And that entitlement will rear its head any time it isn’t 100% catered to, no matter how gently or politely the message (and the one above isn’t even that rude, just direct)… better to confront it and point it out when it arises than tiptoe around it and hope it goes away.

(via birchsoda)

mypetitmal:

Also, the red equality symbol people are posting everywhere as their profile pictures and such is a symbol for the Human Rights Campaign which has historically completely disregarded trans* people and trans* rights, among other shitty things.

Yeah, your ~liberal~ equality symbol might be doing good for some, but it has also harmed many others. 

(via knitmeapony)