copperbadge:

charmingpplincardigans:

wintersoldier-iscoming:

when someone mentions marvel

image

Today at work one of my co-workers goes ‘so, a thing I really like is fan fiction’ all understated-like, and then we spent half an hour eating ice cream and talking about Marvel. (She also asked if I knew who @copperbadge was and I resisted the urge to go ‘LET ME TELL YOU ABOUT STEALING HARRY' AND HOW HARRY POTTER FANDOM WAS FORMATIVE AS FUCK.) 

HAHAHAHA both of these posts are GOLD

I once had a conference with a student that turned into like an hour of us talking about our Avengers feels.

"

It is difficult to be sat on all day, every day, by some other creature, without forming an opinion on them.

On the other hand, it is perfectly possible to sit all day, every day, on top of another creature and not have the slightest thought about them whatsoever.

"

Douglas Adams

this quote was literally in my sociology book 

(via marinashutup)

(via scientia-rex)

thepinkgiftbag said: Are there poc from history that weren't slaves or servents? ( I'm sure there were, but were there any well known ones?)

medievalpoc:

deornia:

medievalpoc:

I get why you asked this question, and I get why you framed it the way you have. But I want to take this moment to break down what you’re really asking, here. Let’s take your question on a world tour.

Education in the U.S. (and some other places, too), is incredibly Eurocentric, and most people don’t even know the histories of places other than Europe pre-1500s, and America post-1500s.

This leads to the following assumptions that 1. all history occurred in Europe; 2. Europe was always dominant as a “continent” over all other continents; 3. That people we consider white are a world majority.

Here’s a breakdown of the would population by continent. We know that they are far from racially homogenous, but a re-framing is definitely in order.

image

Just about 75% of the world’s population lives in Africa and Asia. Notice that’s 60.3% in Asia alone.

As for relative SIZE of continents, a lot of people have really confused ideas about relative sized of continents in relation to each other. A graphic designed by Kai Krause went viral in some parts of the internet a while back, but in case you missed it, here it is:

image

Here’s the whole thing, which has the original data input the graphic was made from, as well as this image of Europe superimposed on Africa, true to proportion:

image

and this:

image

The Peters World Map, introduced in the 70s, generated a lot of controversy because it shows the continents in true area and proportion. It can look oddly “squished” to many people used to a different map:

image

[bigger]

Okay, we’ve discussed the size and proportion of land masses that humans occupy, and relative populousness of those land masses. But what about race? Well, in a lot of ways, the way we construct race is by skin color; dark or light. Here’s a (admittedly super generalizing) map of the world’s human population by approximate skin color. But it helps some people to see it [via Encyclopedia Brittanica]:

image

Now, the “lightest skin” areas don’t necessarily reflect “white people” as we would think of it. Many East Asians and Indigenous people in the north (Inuit, Saami), have light skin.

There is no way to make an accurate estimate of what percentage of the world’s population now are what race because many, many nations do not take a census that records race. Trying to determine racial demographics from past eras, especially in Medieval or Ancient times when concepts like “white people” did. not. exist. is basically impossible, for all intents and purposes. Some people say that a third of the entire world’s population lived in Europe during say, the Middle Ages…as we can see that doesn’t necessarily mean “white people”. Moreover, what are we basing that on? Do they take Chinese documents into account? What about the documents from the library of Timbuktu, which as far as I know are still being explored, cataloged, and translated?

Let’s revisit the question. "Are there poc from history that weren’t slaves or serv[a]nts?"

Now, let’s flip the question: For the entirety of human history, was the majority of the world’s population subject to a minority of the world’s population?

The answer is, of course, no. The expectation that there would be a finite list of exceptions to enslavement and servitude on the part of ALL people of color for the ENTIRETY of human history is based on our current views of the world, based on what we have been taught, and HOW we have been taught it.

These expectations are shaped by the media we consume and create.

image

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These expectations are created by an education curricula for history that begins in Europe, a Europe that is supposedly isolated geographically and culturally, despite the fact that it isn’t even separated by water from Asia.

American history begins with “first contact” or “discovery”, with almost no mention of the political or social history of the continent before being “discovered”. The terminology used in most books and documentaries is definitively Eurocentric: “We” discovered “The Other”. We divide time and space into “The Old World” and “The New World.” WHO, exactly, was this “world” NEW to?

What I would *love* to see is an analysis of how many classes that use books that DO cover non-European history, SKIP those histories because “there’s no time”. I am in a rather unique position to witness this, and have come to believe that this is a very common practice in American/U.S. classrooms. Because learning the same five things about the Revolutionary War and World War 2 for six years in a row takes precedence over learning even the most basic facts about anything regarding World History. WHY do we learn the same things over and over? WHY do we know what we know? WHO wrote it down and said this is not just truth, but The Truth?

I’m not asking these questions because I know the answers…I don’t, really. I’m asking them because I want this questioning habit to spread as far as it can. This blog covers only the teeniest, tiniest portion of human history! The focus is incredibly narrow, because I am only one person. But look how much can be amassed in terms of knowledge, in terms of forming new questions, just by ONE person! A whole generation of people are becoming adults right now, and they should be full of questions. Who is going to write the history for the generation after this one? Can you do better?

Can we do better?

I believe with all my heart that we can.

Well, speaking to my experiences as a teacher, we do it because our kids can’t even manage to remember those six basic facts and because we get fired if they can’t pass the tests the state hands down to us from above.

I wish teachers would stop getting blamed for this shit. I know the difference and I try my best to insert some reality into the classroom… but it’s a constant balancing act because we *have* to teach to the test. Which asks questions where the desired answer is, as far as I’m concerned is flat out wrong… but are multiple choice.

So do we run the risk of losing our job in order to teach kids a truth that they probably won’t remember anyway?

It’s a tough call — even for people who know better and wish we could educate kids in a wholistic manner.

At least in my district, though, we’re forced to adhere pretty closely to a curriculum, to administer a county-mandated test, and to use county-generated handouts.

So please stop blaming the teachers :( We do try, it’s just a lot to fight against.

I’m not really sure why you think I’m “attacking” teachers. Other than if you, specifically, have skipped the entirety of world history in favor of the same five facts as I outlined above, and even then, I blame the way education is legislated, organized and practiced as an institution in the U.S.. I have written about this extensively, and it’s too bad that this is apparently the only post of mine you’ve seen on education.

I’ve made it clear on multiple occasions just how incredibly limited most American educators are on the materials they’re allowed to teach, and how much pressure is on them to prepare students for standardized testing. It’s a disgrace. A lot of educators whose Ethnic Studies curricula have been pressured out of existence or even banned via legislation have ended up trying to continue these works online, or in alternate venues.

Also, I’m not really sure why you’re blaming the students. Education should NOT be some kind of power struggle or war between students and educators, and I don’t think I’ve framed it that way. That being said, there ARE both teachers and professors who actively perpetuate bigotry and make false statements or claims in regard to race and history, but it’s definitely not a blanket statement or universally the case. Accountability still is necessary, and I DO prioritize student experiences on medievalpoc (including the student experiences of those who are NOW educators themselves!!)

Moreover, have you considered that many students might be resistant to or uninterested in a history that teaches them they were “always slaves”, have “no” history, or “were wiped out by colonists”?? When the materials teach about how various peoples of the world have been subjugated, genocided, enslaved, abused, or colonized, with NO mention of histories BEFORE or AFTER, is it any wonder they would rather forget it?

It makes me genuinely, honestly sad in my bones that your opinion of your students is so low.  It’s not surprising that many educators get burned out really, really quickly. But. It makes me wish you could see the feedback I get from my followers; SO many people really ARE interested in history as a discipline, young people, people who like books and movies based on history, people who want to see THEMSELVES in history! I don’t think that is too much to ask.

The state of education in the U.S.: educators and students are mortal enemies with opposite goals.

Once again: WE CAN DO BETTER.

If you let kids read whatever they want, they’ll read more.

lolmythesis:

Masters in Teaching, University of Murcia

For Anyone Who Doesn’t Go By Their Legal/ Given Name:

rabbitglitter:

I just wrote out my template for this term’s classes informing my professors that the name they see on their roster is not the name I go by.

I’m sharing it here in case you need some help wording yours. Just add your own information where the blanks are. Love to you for this upcoming term <3

Hello!

This coming term beginning on January 6, I’m signed up to be a part of your class. I wanted to send you this email as a heads up that while my legal name on your roster should read as “___________”, I prefer to be called ‘_______’.

Being a trans* student can be awkward that first week when reading out names and I’m hoping to avoid confusion by informing you of my preferred name ahead of time.

I prefer ________ pronouns (_______ work wonderfully) and will also accept the use of my name (_____) in place of pronouns if you find that easier.

I’m excited to start this term in your class and I can’t wait to start this year!

Thank you in advance,

________ 

As an instructor, I just want to encourage other instructors to avoid using given names at all until students have expressed their preferences.  When I’m in a situation where I need to call roll, I announce that I’ll be calling the surnames listed on my roster and ask that students respond with whatever they want me to call them.

This template is a great resource, but not all students have a solid plan like this in place, or feel safe/secure approaching all their instructors.

Additionally, this approach puts all students on similar ground in those early classroom interactions, and models the idea that we should always ask other people how they want to be addressed rather than assuming we just know until they demonstrate otherwise.

T-19 days to when I get to see the looks on a bunch of first-year faces when they realize their TA is a massively pregnant pink-haired woman.

It’s the little things.

"The first time I came out to my undergrads was during a unit on the sociological concept of ‘stigma’ in one of my theory courses. In discussing Goffman’s understanding of stigma as a ‘discrediting’ attribute, I told the story of how my 90 year old godmother responded when I told her I date men and women. ‘I’m so, so sorry to hear that,’ she replied, as though I’d been diagnosed with the plague. When I finished my lecture, a student came to the front of the classroom and expressed gratitude for my coming out story. I thanked her for reaching out and asked why she was moved. ‘Well, we look up to teachers,’ she said, ‘and it’s really important for people in positions of authority to help reduce the stigma.’"

On Being Openly Bisexual in Academia (via queeravenger)

When I started TA’ing Intro to LGBTQ Studies seven years ago, I would have students identify as bi in papers but never in discussion section, while gay and lesbian students openly discussed their identity.  After a couple of years, I started explicitly identifying as bisexual on the first day of class, and there was an immediate shift.  Suddenly, at least as many students were talking in the classroom about bisexual and pansexual identity as LG identity.

Non-monosexual people know what kind of reactions we commonly get in “queer” spaces that don’t explicitly welcome us.  Like trans* people, we’ve learned not to put much faith in the B that supposedly includes us.  But when students know that someone in a position of authority shares their identity, the character of the space changes.

(via evelark)

A STUDENT TRIES TO BORROW A RESERVE TEXTBOOK & DOESN’T KNOW THEIR PROFESSOR’S NAME

greekamazon:

cabell:

librarianproblems:

…in November

[gif redacted]

A dude once turned in a paper for me in the departmental office and when they asked him who his professor was, he said, “the pink haired lady.”  That was also like November.

Bad news folks, but this is true of about 60% of the students who come in to get their reserves at any point in the year.  As somebody who has worked the reserve desk, trust me when I say you develop a real skill at being able to determine what resource someone needs with the barest minimum of information.  

"I need that article for the first year psych course" or "Do you have that bio book?  With the information about cells?"  

You also learn to identify people you’ve never met on descriptions alone:

"I’m in that class that has some readings on reserve."
"Do you know the professor’s name?"
"She’s the one with the Russian accent" or "She’s the one who is very excited about space" or "He’s the one who always wears ties" or "He makes awful puns all class long"   

…well, at least I’m highly distinctive.  I did once have a student be unsure if I was the person who’d given a guest lecture to their class a year or two before, and I was kind of like (internally) “…how many women with pink hair do you think there ARE in the sociology department?”

A STUDENT TRIES TO BORROW A RESERVE TEXTBOOK & DOESN’T KNOW THEIR PROFESSOR’S NAME

librarianproblems:

…in November

[gif redacted]

A dude once turned in a paper for me in the departmental office and when they asked him who his professor was, he said, “the pink haired lady.”  That was also like November.

(via chonklatime)

Tags: teaching

invisiblelad:

Shannon Gibney is a professor of English and African diaspora studies at Minneapolis Community and Technical College (MCTC). When thats your job, there are a lot of opportunities to talk about racism, imperialism, capitalism, and history. There are also a lot of opportunities to anger students who would rather not  learn about racism, imperialism, capitalism, and history. I presume MCTC knows that; they have an African diaspora studies program. Back in January 2009, white students made charges of discrimination after Gibney suggested to them that fashioning a noose in the newsroom of the campus newspaper—as an editor had done the previous fall—might alienate students of color. More recently, when Gibney led a discussion on structural racism in her mass communication class, three white students filed a discrimination complaint because it made them feel uncomfortable. This time, MCTC reprimanded Gibney under their anti-discrimination policy.

Elevating discomfort to discrimination mocks the intent of the policy, but that’s not the whole of it. By sanctioning Gibney for making students uncomfortable, MCTC is pushing a disturbing higher-education trend. When colleges and universities become a market, there is no incentive to teach what customers would rather not know. When colleges are in the business of making customers comfortable, we are all poorer for it.

For the white students who escalated their discomfort to the administration at MCTC, what seemed to upset them most is the concept of structural racism. As a teacher, I find that all students struggle with the idea of structure. The American myth of rugged individualism is alive and well. We love to believe that nothing determines our life’s chances but our capacity to dream and work hard, despite reams of evidence to the contrary. For most students, my class is the first time they have ever talked seriously about capitalism or had a black woman as an authority figure. And when the structure in question is racism and someone who looks like me is leading the discussion, white students struggle particularly hard. How can something be racist if they do not intend it to be racist? Andwhy should they listen to me?Sociologists like Joe Faegin and Eduardo Bonilla-Silva have dismantled our post-racial delusions, showinghow racism happens without racists.

Take white flight, for example. Few white homebuyers request only to be shown houses in white neighborhoods. But real estate agents consider thisscreening part of their jobs. And when neighborhoods get too diverse, white families start selling, sparking a downward spiral of declining home values and tax bases that affects resources such as schools. If you’re the brown and black kids in one of those schools, it doesn’t matter if anyone intended to be racist. For those kids and their life chances, structural racism is real regardless of intent. Gibney’s class discussions sound solidly grounded in mainstream research. A white student may feel discomfort when it’s pointed out to him how he has benefited from structural racism, but to compare that discomfort to discrimination is a false equivalency. Hurt feelings hurt, but it is not oppression.

But hurt feelings can be bad for business. And a lot of powerful people think colleges should act more like businesses. When they do, students act more like customers. And our likely customers might not be amicable to discussions about structural racism. If the customer is always right, then the majority share of customers is more right than the minority. While blacks and Hispanics have increased their college participation—and they are projected to continue to do so—61 percent of all college studentsare still white. A survey from researchers at Tufts and Harvard found that “whites believe that they have replaced blacks as the primary victims of racial discrimination in contemporary America.” A sizable number of male voters seem to believe that men are still morenaturallysuited to be president of the United States. Young people think racist and sexist slurs are wrong, but “they don’t take much personal offense.”

If I want to piss off the majority of higher education’s customers, then defying the natural superiority of men by being a female authority figure, countering white oppression beliefs by appealing to structural racism, and making young people feel the emotions of being offended would seem like a good way to go. If, like Gibney, I were a professor hired to teach diaspora studies, doing so would be my job.

Teaching what people would rather not learn is especially tough if you are a woman or a minority professor. Research shows that our customers rate Asian-American, Hispanic, black, and women professors lower than white male professors across all subjects. Most disturbingly, student evaluations of women of color are harshest when customers are told that the results will be “communicated to a third party for the purposes of evaluation.” Our customers are not only disinclined to like tough subjects; they’re also inclined to take their discomfort out on minority professors,who are the least likelyto have the protection of tenure or support from university administration.

Learning is—should often be—uncomfortable for individuals. When universities have a mission to serve the public good, they balance the needs of individuals with benefits to society and the power of the majority against the humanity of the minority. Calls to “unbundle” the university never talk about what happens to that mission when we only learn what makes us comfortable—what it means for minority students and professors or the counternarratives they produce. The promise of market models of higher education like massive open online courses is that student-customers can build their own degree from a buffet of choices. But the buffet is heavy on science and math classes, and light on courses like humanities and social science where structural racism, sexism, and classism are taught. It is easy to imagine that in a college buffet, students who make nooses as a team-building exercise won’t take courses that might make them uncomfortable about doing so. Studentswantingthat choice make sense. Universitiesgivingthem the choice to make a few dollars does not make sense. Visionaries who sell us on these buffets allude to a future meritocratic economy. The implication is that the future does not need gatekeepers, leaders, or citizens who understand why making a noose in the student newsroom might be bad for morale.

Of course, nooses in the newsroom are only bad for the morale of some members of the team—the members least likely to make it to the newsroom because structural racism and sexism makes it harder for them to get there. And should they swim upstream to make it to the hallowed halls of higher education, the newsroom, or the technocratic future, we need not worry about their comfort, because profit margins chase market share. In the higher education market, we’re being sold “the customer is king.” That means a college’s highest purpose is co-creating a future that looks a lot like our past: educated but still unequal. That makes me very uncomfortable.

An incredibly well penned follow up to the very popular story last week from Slate.com

If you don’t already follow @tressiemcphd, the author of the piece, on Twitter, you should.

(via blue-author)

scientia-rex:

cabell:

cabell:

[snip]

When I was in high school, a guy in my “computers” (read: how to format various types of letters) class asked the teacher, “Can I go to the bathroom?”

"MAY I go to bathroom."

(sigh) “May I go to the bathroom?”

"MAY I go to the bathroom PLEASE."

"…how ‘bout I just piss in…

Yeah, the first semester I TA’d, the prof came in to observe one day and was upset that a student had quietly left and returned a bit later in the middle of discussion section.

I told him it had taken me several weeks to break my first-years of the habit of asking to go to the bathroom, and I considered this development extremely encouraging.

I didn’t ask him if it had occurred to him—a sociologist—that the only other groups of people who have to ask permission to use the bathroom are low-wage workers and prisoners, but boy, did I want to.

Good God. Bodily function policing? What the hell. And what if the student was having a panic attack and NEEDED to get out?

Iirc the student was a Black woman, which adds a whole extra fucked up layer or three.

(Source: freddifish)

cabell:

[snip]

When I was in high school, a guy in my “computers” (read: how to format various types of letters) class asked the teacher, “Can I go to the bathroom?”

"MAY I go to bathroom."

(sigh) “May I go to the bathroom?”

"MAY I go to the bathroom PLEASE."

"…how ‘bout I just piss in…

Yeah, the first semester I TA’d, the prof came in to observe one day and was upset that a student had quietly left and returned a bit later in the middle of discussion section.

I told him it had taken me several weeks to break my first-years of the habit of asking to go to the bathroom, and I considered this development extremely encouraging.

I didn’t ask him if it had occurred to him—a sociologist—that the only other groups of people who have to ask permission to use the bathroom are low-wage workers and prisoners, but boy, did I want to.

(Source: freddifish)

auburn-autumn-skies:

firelorcl:

the-doctors-rose:

getoffmybloghoe:

CAN I GET A HELL YEAH!??

*teacher voice* i dont know, can you?

*sighs* “MAY I get a hell yeah?”

*teacher voice* you should have gotten a hell yeah during the break before class started

*frustrated groan* But I didn’t NEED a hell yeah during the break

When I was in high school, a guy in my “computers” (read: how to format various types of letters) class asked the teacher, “Can I go to the bathroom?”

"MAY I go to bathroom."

(sigh) “May I go to the bathroom?”

"MAY I go to the bathroom PLEASE."

"…how ‘bout I just piss in the trash can then?"

She sent him to the office. Even at 15 with a lot of super classist socialization surrounding language and grammar in particular, I remember thinking what a totally abusive asshole you had to be to get your kicks denying people who were forced to submit to your authority the basic right to have HUMAN BODIES.

I hope someday, someone pooped in her car.

(Source: freddifish, via thatcrazytransgirl)

So I don’t know if last year’s class being kind of a shitshow on multiple dimensions discouraged people from enrolling or what (there were a number of issues, which I’m currently thinking about in terms of how to avoid them this time around), but looking at my rosters for next semester I have a TON of first-year students and honestly I’m pretty psyched about it.

There are definitely downsides to teaching first-years, but overall they tend to be a lot more receptive to the idea that there are things they don’t know stuff about.  And the downsides are mostly to do with them having to dramatically reorganize how they handle their lives, which tends to lead to problems that I’m not unsympathetic to.  And it’s spring semester so they’ll have gotten some of that out of their system anyway.

First-years just tend to be more enthusiastic and I dig that.  It makes teaching a lot easier for me and I think I end up doing a better job.

Tags: teaching

on personal experiences of anti-Indian racism in an ethnic studies classroom

kittyvontrubble:

nitanahkohe:

so i don’t think i posted it on here yet, but basically my lecture this week went terrible. the topic (as listed on the syllabus) was “case studies in racism: the american indian experience;” some of the lows of the class include 60-70 white kids yelling at me so loud that i had to yell at them to be quiet at the top of my voice, a white girl telling me she’s “5% Navajo” and that gives her the right to berate me in my own classroom, bizarre tone-policing, and multiple students trying to undermine me and belittle the material by saying things like “the Florida Seminole mascot is an accurate educational tool,” “you’re saying Native Americans are the only ones who experience racism and that’s racist,” “i’m not personally responsible for genocide or racism and i feel terrible about it, but i can’t change it so stop holding me accountable,” and my personal favorite, “you’re only saying this stuff because you’re Native and bitter—i don’t respect you and don’t wanna have this conversation, i don’t have to say shit.” 

it was so bad that about 10-15 students (mostly students of color) came up to me after class to apologize for their classmates’ embarrassingly immature & racist behavior. one of them even said that the class was scary and he was surprised that i didn’t start crying halfway through the lecture. the one cool thing is that those select few students could point to their peers and say that they were an excellent example of how ingrained racism is—that people with passing grades in an ethnic studies class can still pull shit like that and think it’s ok shows that they’re regurgitating rhetoric and not processing this really, and that there’s still deep-rooted racism in that room. 

i had expected some resistance, because this area has a history of pretty overt anti-Indian racism and this campus has not responded well. our ethnic studies department has no Native or indigenous faculty, and i’m the only Native grad student. there are 5 Native grad students total on this entire campus (we are a VERY large public land-grant institution in close proximity to quite a few large Native communities). last semester when a Native faculty member was beaten within an inch of his life just a block off campus, the university didn’t even send a press release or emergency notification for days. my department (ethnic studies) does not offer a grad-level Native or indigenous studies course, and does not require those who teach intro to ethnic studies to have a curriculum culturally sensitive to Native peoples. i asked my department head if i could be added to a faculty meeting agenda to discuss curricula changes and anti-Indian racism in our department, and i was told that was not the “appropriate forum,” and a (thus far unscheduled) private meeting would be best. in both undergrad and grad classes, each time we have had our 1 token reading or class period on “Native issues,” it’s gone terribly, i have been totally and openly disrespected, and i’ve left the class furious and hurt. in day to day interactions with colleagues, i have been told i’m “too ghetto for grad school,” that reservation Indians are lawless drug-addicted criminals, that if Native women don’t want to be raped they should leave their reservations, and that i bear the burden of on-demand proof of Native experiences of genocide. 

i’m fed up, and i’m leaving. i was supposed to stay for my PhD (and was given funding to do so), but i’m graduating early with my MA and would not come back to this institution under any circumstance. my two-year stint here has been so traumatic, i’m taking a break from academia in general—i’m now working for an organization run by and for Native women, and am not planning on pursuing a PhD for a few years at least. this is not about painting myself as a victim, but to be real about how hostile a space as allegedly “radical” as an ethnic studies dept can be to Native students; for my own personal wellbeing, i have to take a breather from this shit. honestly, if i do go back into academia, i think in the long term my goal is to be teaching at a tribal college—i would rather be paid a third of what i could get teaching at a non-tribal institution and working with Native faculty & students, than deal with this shit on the regular for more money and recognition.

in the meantime, i have to teach intro to ethnic studies again next semester, as well as finish up TAing for it this semester. i’m completely rewriting my curriculum and while i wish it didn’t have to be this way, the repeated and consistent horrible experiences i’ve had have demonstrated that i have to treat that classroom like the battleground the students are making it into. it’s really unfortunate because that kind of atmosphere works to the detriment of all of us—it’s exhausting and traumatic for me, and not the ideal learning environment for them. 

i have been begging and demanding support from faculty and administration essentially since day 1, and i have yet to see or hear anything from them at all except “wow that’s totally inappropriate i can’t believe it! so not ok, that needs to change!” (it should be noted these comments have not manifested any concrete changes in departmental or institutional curricula, dynamics, or accountability).

people do not want to be reminded of how ignorant they are, or how complicit in violence they are. i get it. but you’re losing dedicated scholars and educators like myself (and all the students i could have recruited or helped to retain!), and not only reinforcing colonial power structures and systems of domination, but perpetrating colonial/racist violence yourself. 

please read every word of this and realize this woman’s experience is  not the exception in academia—this is absolutely the rule. academia is one of the most virulently racist institutions i have ever personally experienced and it should be held accountable for the way it systematically drives out intelligent, passionate, and extraordinarily gifted marginalized students.

(via rayvenloaf)