(Source: hellotailor, via phosphorescent-naidheachd)

deliciousdannydevito:

burn these statistics into your mind. never forget who it is experiencing the brunt of the prison system’s violence

deliciousdannydevito:

burn these statistics into your mind. never forget who it is experiencing the brunt of the prison system’s violence

(Source: primadollly, via dansphalluspalace)

juliammore:

The FREE CeCe documentary needs your help! Let’s make this better and better with every dollar donated!
http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/free-cece-documentary/x/6227341

They’re up to ~$3000 with 58 days to go, but that’s still only ~5% of their goal. 

juliammore:

The FREE CeCe documentary needs your help! Let’s make this better and better with every dollar donated!

http://www.indiegogo.com/projects/free-cece-documentary/x/6227341

They’re up to ~$3000 with 58 days to go, but that’s still only ~5% of their goal. 

(via thewolfyears)

tranqualizer:

[image description: two Black young women sitting in what appears to be a court setting with their hands cuffed in front of them. they are both wearing orange-red jumpsuits.]
Black Girls Overrepresented in Confinement and Court Placement via forharriet.com by Monique Morris
Nationwide, African American girls continue to be disproportionately over-represented among girls in confinement and court-ordered residential placements. They are also significantly over-represented among girls who experience exclusionary discipline, such as out-of-school suspensions, expulsions, and other punishment. Studies have shown that Black female disengagement from school partially results from racial injustices as well as their status as girls, forming disciplinary patterns that reflect horrendously misinformed and stereotypical perceptions.While academic underperformance and zero tolerance policies are certainly critical components of pathways to confinement, a closer examination reveals that Black girls may also be criminalized for qualities long associated with their survival. For example, being “loud” or “defiant” are infractions potentially leading to subjective reprimanding or exclusionary discipline. But historically, these characteristics can exemplify their responses to the effects of racism, sexism, and classism.More than 42,000 youth were educated in “juvenile court schools" located in California correctional and detention facilities in 2012, according to the California Department of Education, and a disproportionate number of them were Black girls. In the state’s 10 largest districts by enrollment, Black females experience school suspension at rates that far surpass their female counterparts of other racial and ethnic groups. Little has been shared about these girls’ educational histories and experiences inside the state’s juvenile correctional facilities or out in the community.

tranqualizer:

[image description: two Black young women sitting in what appears to be a court setting with their hands cuffed in front of them. they are both wearing orange-red jumpsuits.]

Black Girls Overrepresented in Confinement and Court Placement via forharriet.com by Monique Morris

Nationwide, African American girls continue to be disproportionately over-represented among girls in confinement and court-ordered residential placements. They are also significantly over-represented among girls who experience exclusionary discipline, such as out-of-school suspensions, expulsions, and other punishment. Studies have shown that Black female disengagement from school partially results from racial injustices as well as their status as girls, forming disciplinary patterns that reflect horrendously misinformed and stereotypical perceptions.

While academic underperformance and zero tolerance policies are certainly critical components of pathways to confinement, a closer examination reveals that Black girls may also be criminalized for qualities long associated with their survivalFor example, being “loud” or “defiant” are infractions potentially leading to subjective reprimanding or exclusionary discipline. But historically, these characteristics can exemplify their responses to the effects of racism, sexism, and classism.

More than 42,000 youth were educated in “juvenile court schools" located in California correctional and detention facilities in 2012, according to the California Department of Education, and a disproportionate number of them were Black girls. In the state’s 10 largest districts by enrollment, Black females experience school suspension at rates that far surpass their female counterparts of other racial and ethnic groups. Little has been shared about these girls’ educational histories and experiences inside the state’s juvenile correctional facilities or out in the community.

(via dansphalluspalace)

"It grew out of trying to conceptualize the way the law responded to issues where both race and gender discrimination were involved. What happened was like an accident, a collision. Intersectionality simply came from the idea that if you’re standing in the path of multiple forms of exclusion, you are likely to get hit by both. These women are injured, but when the race ambulance and the gender ambulance arrive at the scene, they see these women of color lying in the intersection and they say, ‘Well, we can’t figure out if this was just race or just sex discrimination. And unless they can show us which one it was, we can’t help them.’"

— Kimberlé Crenshaw, “Intersectionality: The Double Bind of Race and Gender” (via ethiopienne)

(Source: ethiopienne, via so-treu)

"

As a sociologist, I think it is best to turn to the evidence: Do Asians face discrimination? The labor market is one of the best places to take this question because this is where many people believe Asians have reached parity with white Americans.

Asian Americans have among the highest earnings in the United States. In 2013, Asians’ median weekly earnings were $973, as compared to $799 for whites, $634 for blacks, and $572 for Latinos. It seems as if Asians do not experience discrimination. However, these aggregate numbers hide many disparities.

First of all, Asian men earned, on average, 40 percent more than Asian women. The gender gap between Asian men and women is the highest of any racial group. Secondly, these numbers hide the diversity within the Asian community: the 2000 U.S. Census reports Hmong women had an average weekly earnings of just $389 per week – putting them far below average. Whereas Chinese and Indian men earn more on average than white men, the opposite is true for Laotian, Vietnamese, Cambodian, and Hmong men. In sum, some Asians earn more than whites, yet this is the case for only some nationalities – those that have, on average, higher levels of education.

Chinese and Indian Americans have higher educational attainment than their white male counterparts. This helps explain some of the earnings disparities.

Studies that take into account educational achievements find that Asian men earn less than their white male counterparts. Sociologists ChangHwan Kim and Arthur Sakamoto found that if you compare white men to Asian men with similar characteristics, the white men often earn more. In other words, if an Asian American man and a white man both live in New York, both went to selective universities, and both studied engineering, we could expect that the Asian American man would earn, on average, 8 percent less than the white man.

The fact that Asian Americans do not earn as much as white men with the same qualifications points to the fact that Asian Americans face labor market discrimination. In other words, there is a real monetary cost to being Asian American. Over the course of one’s career, this disparity can amount to significant amounts of money.

Labor market discrimination against Asians is not unique to the United States. A study conducted in Australia also uncovered labor market discrimination against Asians. Alison Booth and her colleagues conducted an audit study where they sent 4,000 fictitious job applications out for entry-level jobs, where they varied only the last name of the applicant – thereby signaling ethnicity.

The results were that the average callback rate for Anglo-Saxons was 35 percent. Applications with an Italian-sounding name received responses 32 percent of the time – with only a small statistically significant difference. The differences were starker for the other groups: indigenous applicants obtained an interview 26 percent of the time, Chinese applicants 21 percent of the time, and Middle Easterners 22 percent of the time. According to these findings, Anglo-Saxons would have to submit three job applications to have a decent shot at getting a callback whereas Chinese applicants can expect to submit five.

"

"Hashtag Sparks Discussion About Asian American Discrimination", Racism Review, 12/17/13

Besides the debunking of the “Asians don’t face discrimination in hiring, they show that Americans don’t see race and hire only by qualification” myth, note the massive wage gap between Asian men and women.

(via ami-angelwings)

dear every white dude who has told me that “Asians have more power than white people” -

(via mohala-sumiko)

(via brinstar)

queenitsy:

lesighh:

kwillder:

bonefromthevoid:

hoaxzine:

verbalprivilege:

fromonesurvivortoanother:

ood:

BIG PHOTOSETS FOREVER FOR THEY ARE MUCH HARDER TO IGNORE / a lot of these don’t have hi-res versions available, but i still want to post them

This was not an exaggeration. The government ignored the issue of HIV/AIDS for years before anything was done. Gay and Queer communities had to form their own clinics because no government agencies cared for them. Back then, being diagnosed was equivalent to a death sentence or extreme debt and poor quality of life/a significantly shortened lifespan.

Things got so desperate that people literally had “Die-Ins”— in contemporary usage this refers to masses of people simulating death in order to protest something (like the War in Iraq). In this case, however, fatally sick people would literally lie down in public places and protest with what little energy they had left until they died. There is some footage of a church Die-In in the documentary Beyond Stonewall.  The middle image here of that person’s jacket is not an extreme political statement; it’s what people had to do because they had no other options.

wow.


never forget

queer politics aren’t all hrc t-shirts and shiny lobbying. So many people have already forgotten this extremely recent history.

Seriously, if you don’t know about ACT UP I highly recommend doing some research. In addition to Beyond Stonewall, there’s also United in Anger; it’s streaming for awhile here, but unfortunately it’s only available to stream in the US. 

I have such mixed feelings about ACT UP. On the one hand, I’ve found the group to be fascinating, instrumental, innovative/daring, and inspiring - so much so that I’ve written at least two papers about it. On the other, ACT UP very much represented mainstream gay rights/AIDS activism at the time (and to this day) - largely, white, gay men whose fight often came pointedly distance from or at the expense of other marginalized groups who were suffering from HIV/AIDS oftentimes to greater degrees.

Definitely an activist group, and honestly a time period, worth some in-depth research. Between the mid-to-late 70s and early 90s was such a rich era in modern history. 

Another excellent documentary is How to Survive a Plague, which has news footage from the 80s and early 90s along with interviews with long-term survivors, and it gets into how ACT UP also branched off into TAG (Treatment Action Group, the research/policy wonks who came at the FDA with other methods). 

(It still doesn’t get into the extreme whiteness of ACT UP, though. Arrg, I swear I’ve read an article about that somewhere but hell if I can find it now. Found it! Robert Vazquez-Pacheco on Race, ACT UP and Why Older HIV/AIDS Leaders Need to Pass the Torch.)

fiftyshadesofmacygray:

fiftyshadesofmacygray:

It’s just really hard to look at gendered income inequality without looking at the fact that white women make more than black men, like idk, that whole “women make .77 cents to a man’s dollar” is tired and basic and I don’t wanna hear it anymore tbh.

(sorry, lemme add a couple sources)

(via beandbenotafraid)

callingoutbigotry:

frank-e-fighting-words:

sourcedumal:

popculturebrain:

policymic:

Beyonce pens equality essay, proves she’s the woman’s studies professor you wish you had

Just when you thought your one-sided relationship with her couldn’t get any better, Beyoncé wrote a feminist essay entitled, “Gender Equality is a Myth.” If this makes you want to go back to school and write about the movement that will ultimately be known as Beyoncism, “the interdisciplinary study of how to make feminism the coolest thing ever,” you are not alone.

Read more excerpts

Follow policymic on Tumblr

Really proud of the Tumblr treatment for this post.

Yuss.

but that statistic is just for white women to white men :(

^^^

Actually White women make more.  That statistic is an average across all racial groups.

In 2010:

  • White women made 80.5% of what White men made.
  • Black men made 74.5% of what White men made.
  • Black women made 69.6% of what White men made.
  • Hispanic men made 65.9% of what White men made.
  • Hispanic women made 59.8% of what White men made.

(Source: US Current Population Survey and the National Committee on Pay Equity)

White women have been making more than Black men in the US since 2004, and that’s before we account for disproportionate imprisonment and biased hiring, both of which cut off Black men’s access to comparable jobs in the first place. And obviously Black women and Hispanic people of all genders make even less than that, and are also negatively affected by institutional racism.

None of this is to cast any stones at Beyonce for writing what she did; institutional racism is a huge constraint here, too.

But basically, this illustrates a good rule of thumb for gender statistics: Whatever the statistic is, if it doesn’t account for race and therefore averages people of all racial groups together, White women are doing better, and WOC are doing worse.

(via a-mead-gal)

"My name is not Annie. It’s Quvenzhane."

- 9-year-old Quvenzhané Wallis, correcting the AP Reporter who said she was “just going to call her Annie.” (via shereader)

[gif redacted]

YES BABY!!!!!!!!!!! MAKE THEM SAY YOUR NAME!

(via manif3stlove)

LET’S JUST FUCKING REMEMBER THIS

(via bellecosby)

(via thestoutorialist)

bankuei:

tedtheodorelogan:

cyborgcap:

Cataclysm: Ultimate Spider-Man #28

If you’re not familiar with Ultimate Marve, that’s Miles Morales as Spider-Man instead of Peter Parker. This is him without the costume:

image

Kinda puts that interaction in a different light.

One of my old friends who got out the Crips explained after a point, some of the identification as a gang member came out of internalized anti-Blackness, “We were blue, they were red, anything to be anything but Black….”. I cannot imagine what a mindfuck it would be for a teenager to realize that literally and completely covering your Blackness changes the people who threaten you into your allies. Contrary to all those folks who want to claim every damn thing “is the new Black”, not every oppression has the same options for passing.

(via jhameia)

freemarissanow:

Angela Corey’s abusive strategy is nothing more than a smear tactic to undermine Alexander’s credibility and criminalize her character in an attempt to sway public opinion before Alexander’s new trial at the end of March.   Don’t let her get away with this.  STAND WITH MARISSA.

(via phosphorescent-naidheachd)

campdracula5eva:

bebinn:

rhrealitycheck:

Scarlet Letters: Getting the History of Abortion and Contraception Right 

Abortion was not just legal—it was a safe, condoned, and practiced procedure in colonial America and common enough to appear in the legal and medical records of the period. Official abortion laws did not appear on the books in the United States until 1821, and abortion before quickening did not become illegal until the 1860s. If a woman living in New England in the 17th or 18th centuries wanted an abortion, no legal, social, or religious force would have stopped her.


Reminder that records of contraception and abortion exist all the way back to 1550 BCE in ancient Egypt!
This was a really fascinating read. Until the early 19th century, abortion was legal until “quickening,” or when the pregnant person first felt the baby kick - anywhere from 14 to 26 weeks into the pregnancy. Society only began to condemn it when people decided white, middle- to upperclass women weren’t having enough children soon enough in their lives, and when male doctors started taking over traditionally female health care fields, like midwifery.
Yep, shockingly enough, it’s never, ever been about the life of the fetus - only about misogyny, racism, and classism (ableism, too, though the article doesn’t discuss it).

The bolded is hella important.

campdracula5eva:

bebinn:

rhrealitycheck:

Scarlet Letters: Getting the History of Abortion and Contraception Right

Abortion was not just legal—it was a safe, condoned, and practiced procedure in colonial America and common enough to appear in the legal and medical records of the period. Official abortion laws did not appear on the books in the United States until 1821, and abortion before quickening did not become illegal until the 1860s. If a woman living in New England in the 17th or 18th centuries wanted an abortion, no legal, social, or religious force would have stopped her.

Reminder that records of contraception and abortion exist all the way back to 1550 BCE in ancient Egypt!

This was a really fascinating read. Until the early 19th century, abortion was legal until “quickening,” or when the pregnant person first felt the baby kick - anywhere from 14 to 26 weeks into the pregnancy. Society only began to condemn it when people decided white, middle- to upperclass women weren’t having enough children soon enough in their lives, and when male doctors started taking over traditionally female health care fields, like midwifery.

Yep, shockingly enough, it’s never, ever been about the life of the fetus - only about misogyny, racism, and classism (ableism, too, though the article doesn’t discuss it).

The bolded is hella important.

(Source: americanprogress.org, via karethdreams)

bedbugsbiting:

kawaiiabetes:

i was thinking about this all day today and how fucking stunned i was when i first saw it

I unfollowed someone on Tumblr (after a brief fight) for saying almost exactly this. She said that a law-abiding black person getting harassed by police wasn’t evidence of racism because her white boyfriend has long hair and wears scruffy clothes and is likely to get harassed, too. OH MY GOD, STOP IT.

(Source: jamietheignorantamerican)

note-a-bear:

stephaniebrownisback:

lindsayetumbls:

horticulturalcephalopod:

shadowroseknight24:

Why are we shitting on a kids movie? It’s a movie, calm the fuck down. If you liked it, awesome. If you hate it, alrighty. Just stop. I’ve seen this presentation so many times that it’s stupid.  

  Does anybody really watch to enjoy or to be a huge critic? 

"Shitting on a kids movie" Did you even fucking read what I wrote? If you think pointing out its problematic side while telling people that they can like what they like = shitting on a movie lol

Here’s the fucking thing though, I’m “shitting” on a kids movie because media has a huge, huge impact on how we view society. And do you know who’s really impressionable? Kids.

Have you heard of the Clark Doll Experiments where African American children repeatedly picked the white doll over the black doll? Why do you think that is? If you guessed internalized racism from negative media portrayals of blackness and normalization of white beauty standards, you’d be right. Or how about this recent study that shows that TV boosts the self esteem of white boys? Huh, I wonder if that’s because characters tend to be overwhelmingly white and male.

The thing is that how people are represented (or not represented) in media shapes core social opinions and even self esteems of young children. Disney, a company that specializes in media for children, perpetuating media inequality is a problem that should be pointed out and criticized.

Sorry your “I just watch things to shit on them because I’m a party pooper” strawman does not exist.

So yeah why don’t you sit the fuck back down and go block Frozen on Tumblr Savior if you’re so upset. Thanks.

What I find bewildering is the focus Tumblr has on Frozen as opposed to, you know, every other thing in Hollywood. I don’t see this kind of rage directed at the Avengers. I’m not disagreeing with the red pen OP fundamentally, but that Frozen in particular has been on the end of so much representation-oriented ire when much more par for the course, dumb Hollywood schlock goes un-remarked on. What, GI Joe: Retaliation gets a pass because The Rock is Samoan? If you’re going to call foul, take a bigger look at the wider picture. I find the obsession with Frozen a bit wearisome. 

And “I just watch things to shit on them because I’m a party pooper” totally exist. Trust me. I am that strawman.

I’m pretty sure it’s because the Disney Princess brand and the Disney brand in general is one of the earliest experiences with film media that a kid will really experience and it will remain one that they grow up with, hence why it’s important to expose kids to give kids a variety of role models (i.e. not only one) of their own race at an early age.

side note: I love how somehow media aimed at young girls and women is always “not worth all the criticism”

And by love I mean I see y’all

Media for kids, media for women, media for young girls are all important and ALL deserve a critical viewing

so y’know, before you open your yap to talk about “why this and not X, Y, Z” how about shut the fuck up

(via lesighh)