freshest-tittymilk:

fuckingrenades:

startledatthestillness:

Haha

I’m crying. Omfg.

There are real tears in my eyes

freshest-tittymilk:

fuckingrenades:

startledatthestillness:

Haha

I’m crying. Omfg.

There are real tears in my eyes

(Source: lashlee, via girl-germs)

momlonde:

righteouskungfu:

dersely:

momlonde:

do you ever see a photograph of someone really attractive from like the 1800s and you suddenly get pissed because they’ve been dead for like 200 years and you probably don’t have a chance with them

“probably”

“We have to go back”

image

you are the first person to add a comment to this that wasnt doctor who and it made me smile too bless your soul

Look, sometimes people only come home once every 250 years.

(via todiversegodsdomortalsbow)

gabbysilang:

americachavez:

↳ marvel fancast: angela bassett as ororo munroe

requested by quakenbake

jesusfuck yes

I remember when I was 14 and hanging out on X-Men Usenet groups, and Bassett was ALWAYS the go-to for Storm when we fancast the movie every few months.  Sigh.

(via oliviacirce)

Intellectualizing seemingly petty high school experiences: a memoir.

lolmythesis:

Creative Writing, The New School

like-being-here:

mhektath:

katemonkeyville:

This is me telling you about a game you should be playing right now.
It’s called Gone Home. It’s an exploration game, where you walk around clicking on things and trying to figure out what happened.
In this case, you’re Katie, a young woman who’s just come home after a year in Europe and discovers an empty house and the feeling that something isn’t right.
This is why you should play it:
It’s not horror. It has spooky vibes, and you might start to think that something is going to come out at you, but nothing does.
It’s an independent game by a group of kickass people called The Fullbright Company.
It runs on Windows, Mac and Linux.
It’s short - it’s only around three hours, but then you can play it again with things unlocked or all the lights on, and really explore all the areas of the house.
Were you a teenage girl in 1995?  Do you wish you were a teenage girl in 1995? Get ready for a fucking nostalgia trip like no other. Home-taped X-Files videotapes. A “I want to believe” poster. A Lisa Frank binder. Electric typewriters. Riot grrl zines. Bratmobile and Heavens to Betsy on cassette tapes.
I don’t want to give away too many spoilers, but it’s a queer love story. And it will kill you with everything about it.
Fullbright Company had a place at PAX. They could’ve really sold Gone Home there and made some big cash. Then Mike and Jerry, the douchebros behind Penny Arcade and PAX started being douchebros again. And Fullbright said “No, we’d rather not be associated with you and your douchebaggery.”
Aw hell, people, Watch the trailer. Watch the launch trailer. Buy this game.  If you can’t afford it, wait until it’s on sale at Steam.
Just, please. Support it. It’s such a fucking great game.

Reblogging this in lieu of writing my own Gone Home post — I just finished playing through it and I do not think I could be as coherent as this about it.
The game tells a great story; the house is moody and huge and terrifying but (most of) the things you learn poking through the rooms are quiet and personal and I already know I’ll want to play through it again, once I’ve let it sit in my brain for a bit.

I’ve been raving about this game for five months.

Y’all had me at “Lisa Frank binder,” I have to admit.  Refusing to ally themselves with Penny Arcade is significant gravy, though.

like-being-here:

mhektath:

katemonkeyville:

This is me telling you about a game you should be playing right now.

It’s called Gone Home. It’s an exploration game, where you walk around clicking on things and trying to figure out what happened.

In this case, you’re Katie, a young woman who’s just come home after a year in Europe and discovers an empty house and the feeling that something isn’t right.

This is why you should play it:

  • It’s not horror. It has spooky vibes, and you might start to think that something is going to come out at you, but nothing does.
  • It’s an independent game by a group of kickass people called The Fullbright Company.
  • It runs on Windows, Mac and Linux.
  • It’s short - it’s only around three hours, but then you can play it again with things unlocked or all the lights on, and really explore all the areas of the house.
  • Were you a teenage girl in 1995?  Do you wish you were a teenage girl in 1995? Get ready for a fucking nostalgia trip like no other. Home-taped X-Files videotapes. A “I want to believe” poster. A Lisa Frank binder. Electric typewriters. Riot grrl zines. Bratmobile and Heavens to Betsy on cassette tapes.
  • I don’t want to give away too many spoilers, but it’s a queer love story. And it will kill you with everything about it.
  • Fullbright Company had a place at PAX. They could’ve really sold Gone Home there and made some big cash. Then Mike and Jerry, the douchebros behind Penny Arcade and PAX started being douchebros again. And Fullbright said “No, we’d rather not be associated with you and your douchebaggery.”

Aw hell, people, Watch the trailer. Watch the launch trailer. Buy this game.  If you can’t afford it, wait until it’s on sale at Steam.

Just, please. Support it. It’s such a fucking great game.

Reblogging this in lieu of writing my own Gone Home post — I just finished playing through it and I do not think I could be as coherent as this about it.

The game tells a great story; the house is moody and huge and terrifying but (most of) the things you learn poking through the rooms are quiet and personal and I already know I’ll want to play through it again, once I’ve let it sit in my brain for a bit.

I’ve been raving about this game for five months.

Y’all had me at “Lisa Frank binder,” I have to admit.  Refusing to ally themselves with Penny Arcade is significant gravy, though.

(via azurewhelp)

Day 20: Blown glass slot machine. My MIL got this for us in 2010, after we got married in Vegas. Definitely one of my faves.

Day 20: Blown glass slot machine. My MIL got this for us in 2010, after we got married in Vegas. Definitely one of my faves.

Day 16: I picked out this ornament—at Pier 1, I’m guessing—some time in my early-to-mid-teens. The happiest day of my parents’ lives may well have been when I announced that we needed a starter box for our own family ornament collection and took it away. This isn’t what I’m talking about when I say it’s sometimes difficult for me to determine what is cute vs tacky to other people, though. I know I am the only one who likes this ornament.

Day 16: I picked out this ornament—at Pier 1, I’m guessing—some time in my early-to-mid-teens. The happiest day of my parents’ lives may well have been when I announced that we needed a starter box for our own family ornament collection and took it away. This isn’t what I’m talking about when I say it’s sometimes difficult for me to determine what is cute vs tacky to other people, though. I know I am the only one who likes this ornament.

envygreenpencilred:

lemonsharks:

cabell:

Those of us who do not fit comfortably into either Generation X or Millennials have been discussing this issue, which in turn raised the question of whatever happened to “Generation Y”? Wasn’t that supposed to be a thing?

It was… and then it just didn’t happen. Like Betamax.

So…

Muah ha

I think maybe a key part of being in Gen Y is not having had a computer in the house from birth.

My family got our first when I was 13.

This is useful!  I am clearly too young for GenX, but I also feel decidedly Of A Different Generation from those in their earlier 20s.

My family got our first computer when I was 9, but this was only because my uncle was a computer programmer and made it for us out of scraps.  We didn’t have the internet until I was 13, and if I keep talking I’m going to start waxing rhapsodic about Discovering Fandom and…no.

We got our first computer when I was 6, and I spent the next 5-10 years passionately envying all my friends with game consoles—we never had a Nintendo or anything, although I played plenty of Sierra adventure games.

On the bright side, we had dial-up internet from the time I was 10 (several years before the WWW existed) because my dad was a professor. I spent so much of that summer tying up the phone line MUDding that my dad would just log into the MUD from his office and send me a tell asking if we needed him to pick anything up on the way home…

exit-stage-crowley:

Reblog if you have ever owned/used one of these.


For years my mom thought the 3.5” disks were hard disks, because hey, they weren’t floppy like these!

exit-stage-crowley:

Reblog if you have ever owned/used one of these.

For years my mom thought the 3.5” disks were hard disks, because hey, they weren’t floppy like these!

(via azurewhelp)

iammorethanmemory:

#DID ANYONE NOT HAVE AN INAPPROPRIATE CRUSH ON FOX!ROBIN AS A KID

I had the hots for pretty much ALL the Robin Hoods, except for Jason Connery, who I hated for replacing my beloved Michael Praed on Robin of Sherwood. (I was 6. The death of Robin #1 DESTROYED me.)  But yes, definitely Fox!Robin.  He’s DASHING.

(Source: olivesnook, via dangercupcakemurdericing)

"Times are bad. Children no longer obey their parents and everyone is writing a book."

Cicero, circa 43 BC (via amandaonwriting)

“The recency illusion is the belief or impression that something is of recent origin when it is in fact long-established.”

(via cimness)

(via scientia-rex)

bhaudelaire:

Captain Picard is having the WOOOORST day

Spouse and I just watched this episode the other day—it led to me explaining about Stephen Ratliff and the vast epic tale of Marissa Picard, MSTK’d across Usenet.

I am an old.

(Source: beverly-soong, via dangercupcakemurdericing)

someartsybitch:

standardizedbogey:

The evolution of Crayola

This is actually fascinating.


When I was a kid, my favorite was cerulean.

someartsybitch:

standardizedbogey:

The evolution of Crayola

This is actually fascinating.

When I was a kid, my favorite was cerulean.

(via knitmeapony)

lesighh:

deliciouskaek:

collababortion:

etonia:

nikkipryde:

wholmesianmisfit:

Who remembers

Scholastic

image

Book

image

Orders

image

And then the magical traveling circus of scholastic would randomly show up

at the BOOK FAIR

image

My family had like no money and I was only allowed to order $5.00 of stuff and then my friends got so much and it made me sad. ;3;

We had the Weekly Reader instead…but man, I do remember the book fair. My family was also poor. I got maybe two or three books over all of my elementary school years.  To be fair, I was also a voracious reader and to buy the amount of books I demanded would’ve seriously hurt the family financially. XD That’s why we had a public library. 

Really? Nobody else is going to say “the fuck?” about that Rachael Ray book?

yeah, that’s… :/

omg memoriessssssssss

i remember everytime i got those, i would go thru them meticulously, circling the books i reaaaaally wanted.  then i’d leave it somewhere that my parents would see it in the hopes that they get me one or two of them.  

rarely got any tho.  it was a matter of money and smart spending - why buy books when there’s a library, they said?  can’t fault them for that logic.

We definitely maxed out our library cards on a regular basis (I forget what the limit was on books checked out at once, but during the summer I’d be in twice a week to rotate books), but we also bought a lot of books.  (My family is middle-class and there was money to spare for it, so I was lucky.)  We didn’t actually buy a lot of book order books because my parents rarely thought much of the selection, though.  They made me use my own money to buy stuff like Baby-Sitters Club books, which was usually what I wanted from the book order.

Not a book order story, but I remember once, we were driving from Missouri to Florida to see my paternal grandfather, and this was before reading in the car made me sick, so my parents wanted to buy me something to read to keep me quiet (generally a reliable strategy).  So we stopped at a bookstore, but I desperately wanted a Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark book, which my parents rightly pointed out was unlikely to keep me occupied for even a full hour because I read so damn fast, and what they were looking for was VOLUME.  But I was adamant, and they wanted to get back on the road, so finally they bought me the SStTitD book AND the largest YA trade paperback they could find with no input from me, which turned out to be Amy’s Eyes by Richard Kennedy.  It was 437 pages long—and remember, it was a trade paperback.  It actually lasted me most of the way to Florida.

Back to the book orders: we get them from my baby’s daycare now, and I am a huge sucker (for them).  The nice thing about it all being online now, though, is that a) I can price check them against Amazon (they usually are the same price or cheaper for the same product, though I generally prefer to buy hardbacks and they more often offer paperbacks since most parents don’t want to drop a ton on book orders, who can blame them), and b) they do clearance on previous months’ selections, which meant that this month I’m getting a Christmas-themed hardback book for $5 that was still listed at $9 on Amazon (Fancy Nancy: Splendiferous Christmas, if you were curious).

We did used to count up all the books under the Christmas tree every year (my parents had a definite problem over-spending on Christmas anyway, but when it came to books…).  Our record was something over 70 for the five of us.  I don’t think anyone got much that WASN’T a book that year.

(Source: pyralspite)

On the subject of my childhood & religion…

I was born in Tucson, Arizona, where my father was doing his PhD in biology at the University of Arizona (my mom had her MA in Spanish & Portuguese, and adjuncted there).  Tucson, in case you didn’t know, is where hippies flock to if Madison, Wisconsin is too cold for them.

As a toddler, I talked about Jesus pretty much constantly, having worked out that it made my parents’ hippie friends very uncomfortable.

(Actual quote when, at age 2, I entered the living room to find a parent and friend listening to psychedelic music: “Do you expect JESUS to come out of [the speakers]?”)

When I was not-quite-4, we moved to Rush Limbaugh’s hometown in southern Missouri, and suddenly no one was upset by my Jesus references, so I stopped.

…Then I started kindergarten and became a foaming-at-the-mouth atheist because some other kid told me that if my family didn’t go to church, we were going to hell.

…One of my mom’s favorite stories is about when, in junior high, some kid told me if I didn’t believe in God, I would go to hell, and furthermore if my parents didn’t believe in God, they would, too, to which I responded, “Well, it wouldn’t be hell without Mom there.”