"

For fat women, being stylish isn’t a luxury. It’s often a necessity to get hired, to get access to healthcare, to get treated like a human being.

Fat women have all kinds of narratives about sloppiness, laziness, dirtiness to overcome. Sometimes heels are a crucial part of looking “put together” in a way that sufficiently convinces people that we care about ourselves, that manages to counteract pervasive cultural narratives that fat people don’t care about ourselves. That we have “let ourselves go.”

Being “put together” is part of the way many of us convey to a judgmental world that we are worth caring about.

I get treated completely differently at a $20 hair salon if I’m dressed up or dressed down. Two totally different experiences. I get treated differently at the doctor’s office, and at the emergency room. I can’t go to the ER in sweatpants, because I’ll get shittier treatment. In an emergency, I have to worry if I am dressed up enough to prove that I deserve respect and care.

"

Melissa McEwan: Fat Fashion (via tangerineadamantine)

This is so, so true, but I think it’s important to note that much of it is rooted in classism - the idea that poor people ARE fat, because of their laziness, while fatness happens to rich people but there’s still hope for them.

That’s not to say that fatphobia doesn’t happen to rich people, because it does - but it’s very much signifiers of wealth that make fat people (occasionally) “worthy” of respect. These are signifiers that lots of poor people can’t afford or get shamed for splurging on, and then judged, ignored, and marginalized when they don’t display them.

(via deadlydinos)

(via deadlydinos)

(Source: talesofthestarshipregeneration, via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

campdracula5eva:

bebinn:

rhrealitycheck:

Scarlet Letters: Getting the History of Abortion and Contraception Right 

Abortion was not just legal—it was a safe, condoned, and practiced procedure in colonial America and common enough to appear in the legal and medical records of the period. Official abortion laws did not appear on the books in the United States until 1821, and abortion before quickening did not become illegal until the 1860s. If a woman living in New England in the 17th or 18th centuries wanted an abortion, no legal, social, or religious force would have stopped her.


Reminder that records of contraception and abortion exist all the way back to 1550 BCE in ancient Egypt!
This was a really fascinating read. Until the early 19th century, abortion was legal until “quickening,” or when the pregnant person first felt the baby kick - anywhere from 14 to 26 weeks into the pregnancy. Society only began to condemn it when people decided white, middle- to upperclass women weren’t having enough children soon enough in their lives, and when male doctors started taking over traditionally female health care fields, like midwifery.
Yep, shockingly enough, it’s never, ever been about the life of the fetus - only about misogyny, racism, and classism (ableism, too, though the article doesn’t discuss it).

The bolded is hella important.

campdracula5eva:

bebinn:

rhrealitycheck:

Scarlet Letters: Getting the History of Abortion and Contraception Right

Abortion was not just legal—it was a safe, condoned, and practiced procedure in colonial America and common enough to appear in the legal and medical records of the period. Official abortion laws did not appear on the books in the United States until 1821, and abortion before quickening did not become illegal until the 1860s. If a woman living in New England in the 17th or 18th centuries wanted an abortion, no legal, social, or religious force would have stopped her.

Reminder that records of contraception and abortion exist all the way back to 1550 BCE in ancient Egypt!

This was a really fascinating read. Until the early 19th century, abortion was legal until “quickening,” or when the pregnant person first felt the baby kick - anywhere from 14 to 26 weeks into the pregnancy. Society only began to condemn it when people decided white, middle- to upperclass women weren’t having enough children soon enough in their lives, and when male doctors started taking over traditionally female health care fields, like midwifery.

Yep, shockingly enough, it’s never, ever been about the life of the fetus - only about misogyny, racism, and classism (ableism, too, though the article doesn’t discuss it).

The bolded is hella important.

(Source: americanprogress.org, via karethdreams)

"

Poor people with diabetes are significantly more likely to go to the hospital for dangerously low blood sugar at the end of the month when food budgets are tight than at the beginning of the month, a new study has found.

Researchers found no increase in such hospitalizations among higher-income people for the condition known as hypoglycemia, suggesting that poverty and exhausted food budgets may be a reason for the increased health risk.

Hypoglycemia occurs when people with diabetes have not had enough to eat, but continue taking medications for the disease. To control diabetes, patients need to keep their blood sugar within a narrow band. Levels that are too low or too high (known as hyperglycemia) can be dangerous.

Researchers found a clear pattern among low-income people: Hospital admissions for hypoglycemia were 27 percent higher at the end of the month than at the beginning. Researchers said they could not prove that the patients’ economic circumstances were the reason for the admission, but the two things were highly correlated.

The study, published online Monday in the journal Health Affairs, comes as Congress continues to debate legislation that includes the food stamp program for poor Americans. House Republicans are advocating $40 billion in cuts to the program, a step that Democrats oppose.

"

Study Finds More Diabetic Hospital Visits When Food Budgets Dip - NYTimes.com (via jenn2d2)

America: where we kill the poor.

(via scientia-rex)

(via scientia-rex)

Friendly reminder for my fellow spoonies/depression people/anxiety people/all kinds of things…

missgingerlee:

For the first time in ‘Merica…Cymbalta is available as a generic drug.  I even found it as a generic at a pharmacy. Expensive as fuck Cymbalta that does all kinds of helpful things for people is motherfuckin’ generic in this country. The price is slated to go down as much as 80-90% for those folks paying out of pocket…so let us cheer that Eli Lilly will no longer make up to 22% of their 22.6 BILLION dollars in revenue from a drug that was already a generic in all the other developed countries on the planet.

image

(For the people that do not understand the gravity of this situation, be thankful for that.)

 

annaham:

cartelcoco:

smidgetz:

Nelson Mandela

#please lets not forget what he was about okay

[Description: Black and white graphic of Nelson Mandela with the following quote: “Poverty is not an accident. Like slavery and apartheid, it is man-made and can be removed by the actions of human beings.”]

annaham:

cartelcoco:

smidgetz:

Nelson Mandela

#please lets not forget what he was about okay

[Description: Black and white graphic of Nelson Mandela with the following quote: “Poverty is not an accident. Like slavery and apartheid, it is man-made and can be removed by the actions of human beings.”]

I just lost my shit on Facebook at a guy I went to college with who posted some bullshit clickbait article about “how to raise a smart baby,” which was of course actually basically a numbered list of OMG THESE THINGS THAT BAD (READ: POOR) PARENTS DO MAKE THEIR KIDS STUPID.

Which, first of all, obviously every study they cite is using IQ like it’s somehow objective, but also…

…literally half the research they mention, I can immediately produce research findings demonstrating that any correlation with IQ comes directly from the thing they’re talking about being directly related to POVERTY, which has all kinds of large, well-documented effects on life outcomes. And that’s just OFF THE TOP OF MY HEAD, without looking anything up.

Look, fellow middle-class assholes, our kids will probably do fine because OUR parents owned a home, okay? It’s not because we never let them watch TV and exclusively breastfed and selflessly made the choice to forego cocaine during pregnancy (oh hey, do y’all think the kind of circumstances in which pregnant people use cocaine might be INDEPENDENTLY BAD for children? JUST MAYBE?).

No. Our middle-class kids are probably going to do fine because class mobility is a fucking fantasy.

"All of which makes $15 an hour sound too high. Hardly. Over the last half-century, American workers have achieved productivity gains that can easily support a $15-an-hour minimum wage. In fact, if the minimum wage had kept pace over time with the average growth in productivity, it would be about $17 an hour. The problem is that the benefits of that growth have flowed increasingly to profits, shareholders and executives, not workers. The result has been bigger returns to capital, higher executive pay — and widening income inequality."

— Today’s NYTimes editorial, Redefining the Minimum Wage (via femocracy)

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

hathawaylane:

aragingquiet:

hathawaylane:

aragingquiet:

hathawaylane:

aragingquiet:

hathawaylane:

aragingquiet:

Hey, while we’re talking about voting rights, I’d just like everyone to note that polling places in the USA are widely inaccessible to…

(Source: dangercupcakemurdericing, via dangercupcakemurdericing)

"When poor folks are talking about things like sale codes at Target, or a certain brand and color of underwear at Walmart that is not the time to explain to us why it’s bad to shop at that place and that you buy organic, ethically sourced panties made by vegans by the light of the full moon on tuesday and that they are ONLY 50 dollars and it’s such a good thing to do. Keep that out of the conversation. You’re just going to piss us off."

— I wrote about the intersection of class and fat fashion. I gave some pointers for those who are not poor and talking to poor folks about fat fashion. And gave a lil update. Go forth. Enjoy. (via nudiemuse)

fuckyeahfeminists:

An improvement on the NYC Teen Mom ads.

fuckyeahfeminists:

An improvement on the NYC Teen Mom ads.

(via popelizbet)

"

Generally, overzealous law enforcement delivers its heaviest blows on communities of color and poorer folks. Unfettered and often racist police forces come down hard on specific neighborhoods, and sometimes, in the event of New York City, appear to just stop every Black and Hispanic person they see and pat them down. The imprison-at-all-costs mentality has made Oklahoma in particular famous for having the highest female incarceration rate in the entire world.

This kind of self-destructive zeal usually remains below the surface, something very real in some communities, but not those the popular press particularly cares about. In the past few days, however, an exception has emerged. The high-profile suicide of the computer programmer and internet activist Aaron Swartz — committed it appears in response government prosecutors threatening 50 years of imprisonment for downloading millions of JSTOR articles — has even the Wall Street Journal writing pieces about prosecutorial overreach.

Of course when someone of Swartz’s status faces unconscionable levels of prosecutorial grandstanding, the resulting life-devastating consequences become national news. That’s how things go. It deserves pointing out however that unbelievably harmful police, prison, and justice system mistreatment are everyday realities for certain segments of the US population, generally those less able to capture top stories in the country’s best newspapers. Jamie Lynn Russell was one such person, and unless things dramatically change, we can expect many more victims to come.

"

— Matt Bruenig, Overzealous Law Enforcement Kills (via ok4rj)

(via popelizbet)

"This is a very complex question, but I believe one of the reasons White women have such difficulty reading Black women’s work is because of their reluctance to see Black women as women and different from themselves. To examine Black women’s literature effectively requires that we be seen as whole people in our actual complexities - as individuals, as women, as human- rather than as one of those problematic but familiar stereotypes provided in this society in place of genuine images of Black women. And I believe this holds true for the literatures of other women of Color who are not Black. The literatures of all women of Color recreate the textures of our lives, and many White women are heavily invested in ignoring the real differences. For as long as any difference between us means one of us must be inferior, then the recognition of any difference must be fraught with guilt. To allow women of Color to step out of stereotypes is too guilt provoking, for it threatens the complacency of those women who view oppression only in terms of sex."

— Audre Lorde, “Age Race, Class and Sex: Women Redefining Difference,” 241 (via femmenoire)

(via angelsscream)

"

The CDC recommends that those who experience flu-like symptoms “should stay home and avoid contact with other people except to get medical care.” However, for a huge number of American workers, that option doesn’t exist due to a lack of paid sick days. 40 percent of private sector workers and a whopping 80 percent of low-income workers do not have a single paid sick day. One in five workers reports losing their job or being threatened with dismissal for wanting to take time off while sick.

This problem is especially acute in the food industry, with its high potential for spreading disease. 79 percent of food workers say they have no paid sick time.

"

from Think Progress  (via shiracoffee)

This flu going around is reaching actual epidemic proportions in some cities. A big part of that problem is the fact that low-income people cannot afford to take a day off. So sick people are riding the bus, taking the train, serving your food, and giving you your change at the store. But remember, we can’t give them benefits, because that would hurt businesses. …Well, except for all the money businesses lose when employees who do have benefits have to call out sick. And the lost productivity when sick people come to work. And the increased medical costs of so many people getting sick at the same time. And the additional money it costs taxpayers to pay to treat uninsured people who go to the hospital. And probably some money lost because healthy people are hesitant to go to public places (like stores and restaurants) right now because *they* don’t want to get sick.

But it’s all worth it, because BUSINESS, right guys?

(via stfuconservatives)

(Source: wateringgoodseeds, via a-mead-gal)

queervomit:

cuntofdoom:

str-crssd:

“Sleeping on the streets or walking down the aisle?
It’s time to start prioritizing LGBT youth.”
photo from Transgender Support (worldwide) facebook page.

LOUDLY REBLOGGING

Reblogging again.

queervomit:

cuntofdoom:

str-crssd:

“Sleeping on the streets or walking down the aisle?

It’s time to start prioritizing LGBT youth.”

photo from Transgender Support (worldwide) facebook page.

LOUDLY REBLOGGING

Reblogging again.

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)